Family Law Richard E. Young & Associates

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What is Family Law

Family Law

Family law covers a variety of issues involving family relationships. This legal practice focuses on everything from adoptions, divorce, child custody and many more areas. As attorney’s we represent our client’s in family court or any related negotiations. We are there through the entire process, from drafting legal documents to the actual court hearings.

Family Law Services that We Offer

We offer exclusive work in all aspects of family law including divorce, partner divorce, child and spousal support, custody and visitation, move-aways, and legal seperations. We also specialize in post-nuptial agreements, pre-nuptial agreements, co-habitation agreements, and domestic violence actions. With several years of experience, Mr. Young has handled various difficult divorces involving parent alienation and division of property disputes.

Why Seek the Help of an Attorney?

Relationships can be tough and emotional, especially when multiple parties are involved. If you have never dealt with the law and haven’t had any other family matters that required legal attention, truth is you are probably not equipped to handle a legal situation on your own. An experienced lawyer like Richard E. Young can provide you with the guidance and support that you need to win this battle. A lawyer will give you legal advice, provide you with the necessary documentation and make the process less stressful and easier to understand.

If you or someone you know is searching for a reliable attorney in Orange County, CA to help with family law matters, trust in Family Law Richard E. Young & Associates to provide you with the legal help that you need. With years of experience working in numerous family law cases, you can be reassured that we will work hard to deliver the results that you seek.

Why Should You Hire a Bankruptcy Lawyer?

When it comes to filing for bankruptcy, you always want to make sure to choose the right lawyer. When you file for bankruptcy, it can bring you a huge sense of relief, especially when you are under a debt. Once your case is over, you can get back to your everyday life, debt-free. Sometimes, it is a necessary solution to your problem and is a must that you fully understand the process. And we are here to walk you through it. The bankruptcy forms are daunting enough as they are. Read on and find the many ways an attorney can help!

Complete and Schedule Paperwork

When you begin the paperwork you will have to file pages of financial data. The data will cover debts, income, expenses, assets, and financial transactions. When you hire the right attorney, they will know exactly what you have to disclose and how to value your assets.

Accurate and Complete Testimony

When you file for bankruptcy, you are going to need to sign the paperwork and tell the court, under penalty of perjury, that the information you provided is correct to the best of your knowledge. Your attorney can be there with you through that process to ensure your testimony is complete.

Negotiate With Your Creditors

Throughout the Chapter 7 bankruptcy process, your attorney has the ability to negotiate your reaffirmation agreement and can help you to keep your home or car. If you are going through a Chapter 13 bankruptcy, then your attorney can negotiate on payment terms. Not only that, but they can also negotiate on the value of collateral and interest rates in order to offer you an affordable payment plan.

Peace of Mind

When you leave the case in the expert hands of the right attorney, you can experience a stress-free process knowing that everything is on track. An attorney can provide you with the information to proceed through the case and inform you of the status every step of the way.

All in all, choosing an attorney you can count on is a must. That’s where we can help. Here at Family Law Richard E. Young & Associates, we have years of hands-on experience and are here to get you through the confusing legal process of bankruptcy.

Child Custody and Visitation Laws in California

Whether you have been divorced or separated from your partner, child custody can become a pressing issue. The responsibilities and rights parents have over their children must be negotiated, in or out of court. These cases tend to make it into the courts because of the importance people place on their children, and the tense emotions involved. To learn about the specifics of California child custody and visitation laws, continue reading our blog post.

Types of Custody

There are two difference types of child custody: legal and physical. Legal custody refers to the parent who makes significant choices for their children, in regards to medical, education, travel, or overall welfare. Typically, legal custody is either shared between both parents or given to simply one. The second type, physical custody, refers to the parent(s) your children live with. Typically, the parents decide on joint physical custody or one might request primary responsibilities, which means the other parent has only visitation rights. It is difficult for a child to spend half their time with one parent and half with another, so the time is usually imbalanced.

Judge’s Priorities

Parental custody is decided based on what the judge believes is in the child’s best interests. When deciding on custody, courts will look at the child’s age, health, bonds with their parents and communities, their parents’ ability to care for them, and family history of violence or drug use. Child support is also determined based on the amount of time the children are with each parent. When a court believes both parents are unable to care for their children, they will look into guardianship so the child lives safely.

How to Get a Court Order

The majority of parents can come to an agreement without needing a court order, but if either parent isn’t holding up their end of the deal, the court can enforce a court order. The court can only enforce an agreement if they have a signed court order. The agreement’s terms can be enforced if you turn in a copy to the judge. The judge can sign the deal if both parties agree. If consensus cannot be reached, a judge will send both parents to a mediator, and if this still doesn’t work, the judge will decide the custody and visitation times on their own. A judge can also appoint a custody evaluator to make a recommendation based on their professional opinions.

Conclusion

Establishing a child custody deal can be overwhelming, but with this information, you have a guide of what to expect every step of the way. To get in contact with a professional child custody attorney, make sure you hire us at Family Law Richard E. Young & Associates, where we are dedicated to excellence.

Documents You Need for a Divorce

The paperwork and documents for a divorce are different from state to state, although many requirements are similar. Settlement agreements and financial disclosure forms are just some of the documents you will need to fill out with your divorce attorney. In this blog, we’ll discuss the basic paperwork needed to legally settle a divorce.

Dissolution-of-Marriage Form

Every state requires at least one spouse to file a petition for dissolution of marriage in the local county court. With this document, a spouse must submit it to the court as a formal request. It must then be served to the other spouse, thus beginning the divorce process. The petition includes information about the reason for divorce, contact information for both spouses, and the terms the petitioning spouse is asking for, such as requests for alimony or child support.

Settlement Agreement

Once both spouses have agreed to the terms of the divorce, a settlement agreement will be drawn up. The settlement agreement is a document setting out the terms of the divorce settlement. For example, it may explain child custody agreements and division of property. The agreement can be written after negotiations (if contested) or after the petition is filed (if uncontested).

Financial Disclosure Documents

Both spouses in a divorce must submit documents setting out their finances. Financial disclosure forms may include copies of tax returns for the previous three to five years. In addition, a financial affidavit (which is a legal document sworn under a public notary or authorized officer) may be required to show proof of income and expenses, including information on debts, bank accounts, and property.

Conclusion

Divorce can be complicated. From legal petitions to financial disclosures, both parties may be overwhelmed with the piling paperwork. Consider a trusted family law attorney to move along the divorce process; contact the law firm at Family Law Richard E. Young & Associates. Visit our website to set up a consultation today!

The Breakdown of a Prenup

Whether you’ve been married before or have simply heard about it in the media, a prenup seems to be a pretty controversial topic of discussion. In most recent news, it was reported that Justin Bieber and Hailey Baldwin got married without a prenuptial agreement. When this news broke, the internet nearly exploded! Everyone with an opinion spoke about how foolish it was for Bieber to forgo the protection of a prenup. Now, this begs the question: what exactly is a prenup and why do I need one if Bieber decided against it? Finish reading this blog to learn the complete breakdown of what a prenuptial agreement is!

Basically…

A prenuptial agreement is a contracted agreement that both people who are getting married will sign. Within the agreement, the breakdown of important assets within the marriage are delegated in the event of a divorce or death. Every state has specific laws as to what can be put into the prenup and what is left out, however the degree of distribution is always circumstantial and will vary from couple to couple. No two prenup contracts are the same.  

Circumstantial Fairness

Everybody has a different idea of what is “fair” in life. When it comes to finances and important assets within a marriage, fairness is taken to a whole new level. Many different aspects of the marriage are taken into consideration when deciding how to delegate everything. The assets you brought to the relationship before marriage are documented, along with the potential to inherit different assets down the line.

Full Disclosure

One of the most important parts of a prenup is full disclosure at the beginning of the marriage. Both people must come forward and disclose all the assets that they have before the marriage is final. Within the contract, those assets are protected. If you had a successful business in your name leading up to the marriage, in the event of a divorce, your spouse would have no rights or claim to the business revenue. Assets that are documented to be inherited at a later date from a family member should be included in a prenup as precaution. Imagine your father or mother had a successful business that was to be passed down to you; should you divorce, a prenup with disclosure on the future inheritance of this business will protect you from having to worry about your spouse seeking anything from the matter.

Alimony?

Most prenup agreements will cover the topic of alimony. More times than not, alimony is only brought up in the agreement if it’s being waived. At the end of a marriage, without the mention of alimony in the prenup, either person could attempt to receive alimony from the other. However, this is to be determined by a judge at a later date. If waiving the right to seek alimony is agreed upon by both people, it can be a great precaution down the line.

Children?

When it comes to divorce, many people immediately think of their children. The struggle to fight for custody can be relentless and stressful. Many will look into prenup agreements to see if they can put into motion the agreement of what will happen to the children in case of divorce. Unfortunately, prenuptial agreements aren’t allowed to include the topic of children. All situations involving children must be directly handled in court by a judge. No prewritten agreement will ever be able to say otherwise.

Conclusion

Prenups are a heavily discusses topic in the media. This type of agreement is a great way to stay protected should the marriage end on less than happy terms. Both parties are fairly considered and it is decided what the fairest way to divide everything is. If you’re interested in learning more about prenuptial agreements before you say “I do,” check out our website and give us a call today!

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