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Annulments vs. Divorce

While most people know what a divorce is, an annulment is a less commonly known term that describes a similar legal process. In this month’s blog post we will explore the major differences between the two and exactly what should be understood about them before seeking representation and beginning their official legal processes.

Annulments

Those who are hoping to be granted an annulment have to meet a certain criteria, otherwise by default they will have to instead file for a divorce. In order to qualify for an annulment both parties have to agree that the marriage wasn’t ever legal or legitimate in the first place. Couples who have been granted an annulment move forward as if their marriage never existed.

Divorce

When a couple files for a divorce, it’s typically after an extended amount of time has passed since the marriage began and both parties have decided to part ways for any number of reasons. In a divorce both people have to agree on the fact that their marriage was always a legitimate union, however they also agree that it should not continue any further.

Conclusion

At the end of the day, both a divorce and an annulment effectively end a marriage. Some consider annulments much simpler processes because couples don’t have to go to court to divide their estates, pay alimony, or child support. If you or someone you know is seeking a highly skilled family lawyer who specializes in divorce and annulments, visit our website here.

Grounds for Nullifying a Prenup

When you sign a prenuptial agreement with your spouse, you are agreeing to the terms written in the document. However, there are certain situations where a prenup can be nullified. If there is evidence in the agreement that can be challenged, you can talk to a lawyer to discuss any legal questions or concerns you have about the contents of the document. Learn more about the grounds you can use to nullify a prenuptial agreement.

Unconscionability

An unconscionable contract is one that is so one-sided that it is unfair to one party and therefore unenforceable under law. It is a type of contract that leaves one party with no real, meaningful choice, usually due to major differences in bargaining power between the parties. If a prenuptial agreement is considered unconscionable in court, then the judge can void it.

Failure to Disclose

Both parties need to disclose any information regarding wealth and assets. The reason behind this disclosure is to decide on the amount of alimony or property division in the event of a divorce. If your partner hides any personal assets or valuable interests, then there’s reasonable grounds to challenge the prenup. You can state you were unaware of extra funds and other properties before signing.

Coercion

Boyd Law states “the courts will throw out a prenuptial agreement if a spouse can prove that someone coerced him or her into signing the document. Coercion can take the form of blackmail, threats, or simply undue pressure.” An example of this can be if your partner had you sign the day before or on the wedding and you didn’t have enough time to look at it thoroughly.

Conclusion

The lawyers at Family Law Richard E. Young & Associates have many years of practice handling legal cases, including prenuptial agreements. If you or a loved one needs to speak with an attorney, contact our family law firm to get the legal assistance you need. You can also visit our website here for more information.