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Vacation Time and Child Custody

Imagine this: it’s the holidays and everyone is ready for a vacation. People are excited to take a load off and spend quality time with their loved ones. Maybe they’ll take a road trip or go out-of-state for sight-seeing and new experiences. However, this can be a difficult and tense subject to navigate between divorced parents. Planning vacation time can come with its own set of challenges especially when it involves a child custody agreement and limited scheduling.

Scheduling Vacation Agreements

For those who are still working through the details of a child custody and parenting plan, it’s important to clearly define vacation time between you and your ex-partner. All parents want to spend time with their children and for divorcees, having a coordinated vacation schedule will help prevent conflicts by setting some ground rules.

Talk to your ex-partner and clearly define what can and cannot be done. Here are a few examples of what to agree upon:

  • Determine agreeable vacation destinations, whether it be local, out of state, or out of the country.
  • Set equal vacation days so your children can spend enough quality time with both parents.
  • Discuss activities that the children will participate in during the vacation.

Some divorced parents may choose to establish specific dates each year in which they can take their children on vacation. Others may choose to have unspecified dates instead, but are required to notify the other parent in advance of when they plan to take their children on vacation. Regardless of what option you may choose, it is important to be clear and communicative with each other.

Be Transparent with Each Other

Incorporating vacation plans can be difficult and tedious but it’s important to prevent conflicts. In order to be transparent with each other, some divorcees may opt to put plans into writing to ensure each party is aware of the set guidelines. If you decide to make any changes to your plans, remember to inform the other. If an emergency were to happen on a vacation, it’s important for the other to be aware of where you are and what you were doing. Understand that remaining communicative with each other is the first step in overcoming conflicts in a child custody agreement.

Conclusion

Establishing a vacation plan can be overwhelming, but by following agreed upon guidelines, divorced parents can easily navigate and coordinate with each other while spending quality time with their children. Here at Family Law Richard E. Young & Associates, we help divorcees navigate confusing and tense child custody agreements. If you have any questions or concerns, contact us at (949) 951-9529 or visit our website to learn more about our services.

Child Custody and Visitation Laws in California

Whether you have been divorced or separated from your partner, child custody can become a pressing issue. The responsibilities and rights parents have over their children must be negotiated, in or out of court. These cases tend to make it into the courts because of the importance people place on their children, and the tense emotions involved. To learn about the specifics of California child custody and visitation laws, continue reading our blog post.

Types of Custody

There are two difference types of child custody: legal and physical. Legal custody refers to the parent who makes significant choices for their children, in regards to medical, education, travel, or overall welfare. Typically, legal custody is either shared between both parents or given to simply one. The second type, physical custody, refers to the parent(s) your children live with. Typically, the parents decide on joint physical custody or one might request primary responsibilities, which means the other parent has only visitation rights. It is difficult for a child to spend half their time with one parent and half with another, so the time is usually imbalanced.

Judge’s Priorities

Parental custody is decided based on what the judge believes is in the child’s best interests. When deciding on custody, courts will look at the child’s age, health, bonds with their parents and communities, their parents’ ability to care for them, and family history of violence or drug use. Child support is also determined based on the amount of time the children are with each parent. When a court believes both parents are unable to care for their children, they will look into guardianship so the child lives safely.

How to Get a Court Order

The majority of parents can come to an agreement without needing a court order, but if either parent isn’t holding up their end of the deal, the court can enforce a court order. The court can only enforce an agreement if they have a signed court order. The agreement’s terms can be enforced if you turn in a copy to the judge. The judge can sign the deal if both parties agree. If consensus cannot be reached, a judge will send both parents to a mediator, and if this still doesn’t work, the judge will decide the custody and visitation times on their own. A judge can also appoint a custody evaluator to make a recommendation based on their professional opinions.

Conclusion

Establishing a child custody deal can be overwhelming, but with this information, you have a guide of what to expect every step of the way. To get in contact with a professional child custody attorney, make sure you hire us at Family Law Richard E. Young & Associates, where we are dedicated to excellence.